The Grandparent Game

It takes fitness and stamina to be a grandparent—it’s practically a sport. After a few days of watching my parents with my daughter, I came up with a short, simple sequence that  prepares you for the physical requirements of grandparenting. Practice this sequence ahead of a visit with babies or before a family vacation with little kids— it only takes about 5 minutes. We’re standing on a yoga mat here, but it’s not needed. You don’t need any props for this sequence, and you can even do it with your shoes on. My dad (Umpa, to his grandchildren) filmed with me and did a great job of demoing!

Problem

For a weekend with grandchildren, you need stamina, a healthy spine, and strong glutes (for picking up those little kiddos).

Solution

A simple, short sequence you can do anywhere and anytime.

—Alexandra

Relief for Your Upper Back, Part 2

In part 1 of this series, we explored a passive backbend you can enjoy most days for several minutes at a time. If you’ve been practicing that shape diligently in the last two weeks, you’re ready for part 2. (If you haven’t, that’s OK; do one five-minute hold of the pose, then join us here.) The flexibility you’ve created across your chest by stretching it is critical to the exercises demoed here, as tightness through the chest will prevent you from developing strength across the upper back.

Problem

When the upper spine rounds forward and the chest is tight, the muscles of the upper back are held long and lose strength.

Solution

Once you’ve cultivated chest flexibility, work to strengthen your upper back.

In this video, I demonstrate some exercises to do standing, on hands and knees, and on your belly to strengthen your upper back. Do the ones that work for you—if being on your wrists doesn’t feel good, skip those—most days until you feel pleasant fatigue. After a few weeks, you’ll feel the difference!

—Sage

The Art of Contentment

One of the restrictions of aging is a loss of flexibility and mobility. Not being able to move as much as we used to can lead to not moving much, which creates a negative spiral. One of the glories of aging is knowing that everything changes and developing a sense of acceptance. In yoga, we’d call that santosha, contentment. It’s the key to preventing avidya, wrong seeing, which you can read more about here.

This is a fine alternative to reverse table or reverse plank—like them, it stretches your chest while being sweeter on your wrists and shoulders.
This is a fine alternative to reverse table or reverse plank—like them, it stretches your chest while being sweeter on your wrists and shoulders.

To find contentment in your yoga asana practice, be clear on the purpose of each pose. When you understand why you’re doing something, it’s easier to find a substitute that will get the job done in ways that are appropriate for your body in this moment—not what you had in the last ten years, last year, last month, or even yesterday. Otherwise, you’re setting yourself up for struggle and “failure.”

Choose the path of right seeing by looking at what is happening right now.

—Sage

Props: Three Uses for a Yoga Strap

Yoga props can make your practice more productive and kinder for your body. We looked at some of the uses of the yoga block already. This week, let’s look closer at the yoga strap and its three main uses. In poses, a yoga strap can help you connect, stretch, or stabilize.

Yoga straps are 6-10 feet in length, and for most bodies the shorter length is perfect. Straps are made of thick, woven canvas and have a plastic or metal buckle so the ends can be easily connected. If you don’t own a yoga strap, no problem: you can use a tie or a belt in its place.

In this video, I show how you can use a yoga strap to connect, stretch, and stabilize. Grab a yoga strap and come along!

Connect

Imagine the yoga strap as an extension of your arm. If you’re reaching for your foot and  your hand doesn’t quite reach, your strap can fill the gap of those last few inches and help you make the connection.

Stretch

Shoulder stretching and hamstring stretching are made most effective by using a yoga strap. For shoulder stretching, place the strap in each hand and open your arms shoulder-width or wider. Reach both arms overhead and explore your shoulders by moving your arms behind you or from side to side. For hamstring stretching, lie on your back and wrap the strap around your foot. Extend that foot skyward and feel your hamstrings get looser as you move your leg around in space.

Stabilize

Sometimes we want to hang out in a passive or restorative shape and use as little effort as we can. The yoga strap makes that possible. In a pose like bound angle pose, the strap can be utilized to keep your body in one shape while you relax.

—Alexandra