A Simple Fix to Save Your Wrists

Certain yoga poses require your hands to support your weight. Many of these poses have modifications, so if you have arthritis or inflammation and pain in your wrists, you can find a variation of the pose that’s safer for you. Downward-facing dog, for instance, can be practiced at a chair or at the wall. Some poses, though, aren’t as easily modified to take weight out of your hands. Plank pose requires your hands to be on the ground, and in the pose, your wrists help support your body weight. If your wrist ailment gets exacerbated by use, you can skip poses that aggravate your condition. There are often substitute poses that challenge or stretch in a similar way. In lieu of plank, a pose like roll down is a good alternative.

If discomfort in your wrists isn’t linked to a chronic condition, it might just be a matter of building strength. Over time as you practice plank or downward-facing dog (in its traditional orientation), your upper body will get stronger and your wrists will feel more supported by the muscles in your upper arms, shoulders, and back. But in the interim, it’s important to care for your wrists.

Problem

As you build strength in your upper body, caring for your wrists is important. If you experience any wrist pain, how do you protect your wrists and still practice poses like plank and downward-facing dog?

Solution

First, anytime you’re on your hands, be sure to spread your fingers wide, so you can see mat between your fingers. Engage the muscles in your whole hand, pressing each finger down on to the mat. This will help distribute the weight, so your wrists aren’t bearing all the work. Another easy fix is to add padding under your hands. You can do this by using a blanket under the base of your palms or by double (or triple) folding your mat. In either case, the padding changes the angle of your wrists and alleviates some of the pressure.

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A blanket under your wrists decreases the bend, making it significantly sweeter.
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If class is moving quickly or you don’t have a blanket nearby, fold up your mat for wrist support.

Finally, you can always make fists and balance your weight on your knuckles, if that feels better. The bottom line: if you have wrist concerns, explore your options. There may be a perfect fix that will keep your wrists supported and allow you to do hands-on-the-mat poses.

—Alexandra

Stand Up With Strength and Ease

Problem

As we age, even if we’re active in a myriad of ways, getting up easily from a chair can get a little harder. We need the ability to stand with strength and ease in order to maintain an independent life.

Solution

Practice mindful standing in a series of successively more challenging (and fun!) ways.

—Alexandra

Relaxing: An Important Part of Your Practice

A few weeks back, Sage posted about consistency and variety. It’s important to establish a regular yoga practice, and it’s equally as important to make sure your yoga practice doesn’t get so routine that it stops helping you grow. Sometimes the yoga we need in order to grow is the kind that is physically challengingwe find ourselves a little sore a couple of days later. Just as important, though, is relaxing, restoring, and using yoga as a tool for recovery (whether that recovery is from a hard training session or from a weekend with grandchildren.)

There are many restorative yoga poses. Sage offered one last week: Legs up the Wall. My other favorite restorative poses are the ones offered below. They allow you to passively open your chest and shoulders (supported fish), gently support your body in a twist (supported twist), sweetly open the side body (supported side stretch) and turn on your parasympathetic nervous system (supported bridge poseor really all of them!)

As we move into warmer spring weather and get more active, it’s important to take time to unwind, relax, and get quiet. Your body needs it to continue to get stronger and your mind (and spirit) needs it, too.

To explore these poses, gather a bolster, block, and a mat. If you have an eye pillow handy, even better!

IMG_8105(1).jpgSupported fish pose: Lie on your back. Position the bolster raised on an incline on a block. Place the small of your back against a bolster and lie back on it. An eye pillow on the eyes may feel nice, too. Want more options? Check out this post on supported fish, too.

 

IMG_8107.jpg Supported twist: Sit with legs curled to one side. Place bolster with the short-side to your hips. Twist body and drape your belly and chest over the bolster. Your head can turn the opposite direction of your knees for more twisting, as I’m showing here. It may also feel nice to place a block between your knees. (Repeat this on the other side.)

 

IMG_8108.jpgSupported side stretch: Sit with legs curled to one side. Place your bolster with the short-side to your hip. Stretch the side of your body onto the bolster. Your top arm should drape alongside your ear. It may be nice to hold on to the bolster with that hand. Your bottom arm can settle under your head or drop in front of the bolster, if that is comfortable.  (Repeat this on other side.)

 

IMG_8106.jpgSupported bridge pose: This version of bridge offers support for the hips. Place a bolster or a block underneath your pelvis. Stretch arms out to the sides and relax. An eye pillow over the eyes might be nice, too. For a deeper release at the front of your hips, try straightening your legs.

—Alexandra

Props: Three Ways to Use a Yoga Bolster

Props are an important aspect of a yoga practice. They make some poses more available, some poses more challenging, and many poses kinder for our bodies. In my previous posts on props, we’ve looked at the uses for straps and blocks. This week we look at the sweetest of props: yoga bolsters. Bolsters are versatile, but all of their uses come back to their name: they bolster you. You can sit on them, use them as padding, and relax onto them in supported and restorative poses.

Sitting

Try sitting on a bolster with your legs in a sweet criss-cross position or try using the bolster as a saddle. Either way, you’ll probably notice that sitting on the ground is a lot more comfortable. You can use a bolster to lift your hips a little higher in any seated yoga pose.

Padding or Propping

Bolsters can be used to pad knees in poses like low lunge. They can serve as props for your hips in poses like pigeon. In a sweet resting pose like child’s pose, they can be used under your head. Any time the ground feels too far away from your body, use a bolster to fill the gap.

Restoring

My favorite use for the bolster is as a prop for restorative yoga and supported poses. Bolsters can give your upper body a lift in supported fish and can elevate your hips in supported bridge. They can also be used in a traditional savasana pose, slid under the knees for a sweeter experience for the low back.

—Alexandra

Hack Your Sun Salutes, Part 2

In Hack Your Sun Salutes, Part 1, we looked at ways to modify the front end of sun salutations. Today: ways to work around limitations on the back end.

Problem

It can be tough to step your foot forward from downward-facing dog, either because of tightness, comparatively less strength in the upper body, or issues in the foot and toes of the back leg.

Solution

In this video, I offer some workarounds. To modify the step forward, you can take more than one step toward lunge, lift to your fingers, or use a block to elevate your upper body. Or avoid it all together! It’s fine to modify in class—you know you’ve found the right teacher when you feel comfortable leaving out poses that don’t work in your body in that moment.

Props: Three Uses for a Yoga Strap

Yoga props can make your practice more productive and kinder for your body. We looked at some of the uses of the yoga block already. This week, let’s look closer at the yoga strap and its three main uses. In poses, a yoga strap can help you connect, stretch, or stabilize.

Yoga straps are 6-10 feet in length, and for most bodies the shorter length is perfect. Straps are made of thick, woven canvas and have a plastic or metal buckle so the ends can be easily connected. If you don’t own a yoga strap, no problem: you can use a tie or a belt in its place.

In this video, I show how you can use a yoga strap to connect, stretch, and stabilize. Grab a yoga strap and come along!

Connect

Imagine the yoga strap as an extension of your arm. If you’re reaching for your foot and  your hand doesn’t quite reach, your strap can fill the gap of those last few inches and help you make the connection.

Stretch

Shoulder stretching and hamstring stretching are made most effective by using a yoga strap. For shoulder stretching, place the strap in each hand and open your arms shoulder-width or wider. Reach both arms overhead and explore your shoulders by moving your arms behind you or from side to side. For hamstring stretching, lie on your back and wrap the strap around your foot. Extend that foot skyward and feel your hamstrings get looser as you move your leg around in space.

Stabilize

Sometimes we want to hang out in a passive or restorative shape and use as little effort as we can. The yoga strap makes that possible. In a pose like bound angle pose, the strap can be utilized to keep your body in one shape while you relax.

—Alexandra

Props: Yoga Blocks for Better Yoga

Doing some yoga? You should give yourself props! And although you deserve accolades for getting to a mat and moving, the props I’m speaking of are the literal ones. This week, let’s talk about the yoga block, an important prop that can help you align, strengthen, and play your edge. In weeks ahead, we’ll explore other uses of the block (it can be supportive, too!) and we’ll look at additional props—the strap, bolster, blanket and more.

Yoga blocks are small, firm rectangular blocks, often made of heavier foam or wood. If you don’t have a block, a thick book can do the job just as well. It’s useful to have at least one on hand, and in some poses two blocks would be even better.

Align

Use your yoga block to help you find optimal alignment. In a pose like triangle pose, it’s easy to reach too far forward of the front shin or to lose integrity in the pose by reaching for the ground. Placing a yoga block under your hand helps you keep your arms in a straighter line, and it allows you to find a “just right” stretch instead of a “too much” one. Any time the ground feels far away (especially in forward folds or lunges), a yoga block can serve as the buttress for better yoga, helping you find safe alignment for your knees, hips, shoulders, and back.

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Chris Mason, 57, explores triangle pose as a counter balance to cycling

Strengthen

Use your yoga block to make poses a little spicier. In poses like plank, bridge, or mountain, you can add a block to build strength. In all three of these poses, placing a block between your thighs and squeezing will help you find more engagement in your legs and inner thighs.

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A block between your thighs will make mountain pose spicier

Play your edge

Use your yoga block to play your edge in balance poses where one or both hands reach toward the earth. In half moon pose or standing split, the block brings the earth closer to you. This creates stability so you can explore the fullness of the pose in your body. By pressing into the block, you can better stabilize the standing leg and find your edge in lifting the extended leg.

Use a block for stability and play your edge!

—Alexandra