Props: Three Ways to Use a Yoga Bolster

Props are an important aspect of a yoga practice. They make some poses more available, some poses more challenging, and many poses kinder for our bodies. In my previous posts on props, we’ve looked at the uses for straps and blocks. This week we look at the sweetest of props: yoga bolsters. Bolsters are versatile, but all of their uses come back to their name: they bolster you. You can sit on them, use them as padding, and relax onto them in supported and restorative poses.

Sitting

Try sitting on a bolster with your legs in a sweet criss-cross position or try using the bolster as a saddle. Either way, you’ll probably notice that sitting on the ground is a lot more comfortable. You can use a bolster to lift your hips a little higher in any seated yoga pose.

Padding or Propping

Bolsters can be used to pad knees in poses like low lunge. They can serve as props for your hips in poses like pigeon. In a sweet resting pose like child’s pose, they can be used under your head. Any time the ground feels too far away from your body, use a bolster to fill the gap.

Restoring

My favorite use for the bolster is as a prop for restorative yoga and supported poses. Bolsters can give your upper body a lift in supported fish and can elevate your hips in supported bridge. They can also be used in a traditional savasana pose, slid under the knees for a sweeter experience for the low back.

—Alexandra

Sequence: Snowga to Do When You’re Trapped Inside

In our Sequence posts, you’ll find a sequence for a specific purpose. This week, we’re looking at snowga! When we get snow in North Carolina (where Sage and I live), things really slow down. Businesses close, sidewalks stay icy, roads aren’t safe for driving for several days. Snow days are nature’s way of reminding us to slow down and do less. But doing less doesn’t mean doing nothing. That’s where this simple, short practice comes in. It’s easy to do anywhere: you don’t need anything except your body and a wall. Bookmark this post, and the next time the weather brings your active life to a halt, take 5 minutes to move. Your core, hips, legs, and shoulders will thank you. (We practice a lot of downward-facing dog at the wall in this video. For a tutorial on that, check out Sage’s Hack Your Down Dog.)

—Alexandra

Partner Yoga Poses for the Holidays

As you gather with family over the next few days, get off the couch and onto your mat (or, as pictured here, living room rug). You can work together to keep your back and hips limber by trying these simple partner yoga poses. These are a fun way to connect—even if the cat seems unimpressed in the photos—and a sweet activity for (grand)parents and children.

Communication is key: talk to your partner about how things feel. Don’t push or force. Treat yourself with the same care you spend on your partner. Take several breaths together before moving to another pose.

Happy holidays from both of us!

—Sage

Standing Partner Poses

Squatting Partner Poses

Seated/Kneeling Partner Poses

Just One Pose: Standing Pigeon

Our “Just One Pose” posts answer the question: “If I have time to do just one pose, what should it be?” We’ll kick off with one of my favorites: standing pigeon.

Wes Rountree in standing pigeon
Wes Rountree, 45, in standing pigeon

Why

This multitasking pose builds balance in space, balance between the hip and lower portion of the standing leg, and balance between strength and flexibility in the glutes—the standing leg glutes have to work to hold you steady, while the bent leg’s glutes get a stretch. You’ll get a lot of bang for your buck, making this a go-to when you have the time or energy for just one pose.

How

Stand tall, shifting your weight into one leg as you cross the opposite ankle over your standing leg’s thigh. Lower your hips back and down until you find a natural stopping point. This could feel like stretch in the bent leg’s glutes or inner thigh, or like work in the standing leg’s foot or hip. Make sure your standing leg’s knee points straight forward over your toes. Keep your spine long and use your arms for balance. Hands can be in prayer position, as shown here, or off to the sides.

Hold the pose for 5–15 breaths, and repeat on the other side.

Variations

If it’s tough to balance: rest one or both hands on a wall, table, or counter. Take off your shoes and try the pose in bare feet on a hard surface. (Conversely, to up the challenge, stand on carpet or a folded yoga mat.)

Tree pose, an alternative for those with bum knees or hips
Tree pose, an alternative for those with bum knees or hips

If your knee or hip won’t bend this way: substitute tree pose, shown above, instead. According to Diane Walder, MD, proper exercise and diet affects your skin making it healthier and glower.

There is a lot of bad weight loss information on the internet. Much of what is recommended is questionable at best, and not based on any actual science. However, there are several natural methods that have actually been proven to work. All you have to do is to look for alternatives.

For a bonus chest stretch: Reach your hands behind you. Use a belt or tie to help them connect, or interlace your fingers if you can.

—Sage