Share Your Questions

Alexandra and Sage
Alexandra and Sage

We are in the home stretch of drafting Lifelong Yoga, our book to be published by North American Books next summer. Our goal is to tell and show you how to develop and modify a practice to take you through your forties, fifties, and far beyond. We’re covering adaptations for common age-related conditions, appropriate expressions of poses for various bodies and needs, and yoga philosophy.

Here’s your chance to help direct the book. What are your biggest questions around making yoga a lifelong practice? How has your practice changed, and how did you adapt? What would you most like to learn about yoga through the years?

Please let us know in the comments and on Facebook. Thanks in advance!

—Sage

Breath to Support Stillness in Your Yoga Practice: Back Bends and Forward Folds

We’ve been looking at how your breath supports your movement in your workouts—see “The Right Breath for Now,” “Breath to Support Movement,” “Breath to Support Movement in Your Yoga Practice,” and “Breath to Support Stillness in Your Yoga Practice: Balance and Twists.” Let’s look at how the breath relates to the movement of your spine forward and back.

Breath and Backbends

Use inhalations to extend your spine even longer.
Use inhalations to extend your spine even longer.

In general, we use inhalations to support lifting actions. This holds true in backbends, as well. A full inhalation will decrease the curve of your thoracic spine, extending your back. As you hold a backbend like the chest lift depicted here, notice the sensation of length that rides on every breath in, and try to maintain it as you breathe out.

Breath and Forward Folds

Use exhalations to help you settle in forward folds.
Use exhalations to help you settle in forward folds.

As the spine moves forward, exhalations become your friend. As you hold a forward fold, you’ll notice that every breath in floats you slightly up, then every breath out will settle you deeper. Notice that exhalations can encourage you to round your upper and mid-back. Be careful with this movement, as too much forward flexion can be rough on the spine and disks. Keeping a longer spine is generally a good idea—even if that means you don’t fold very far forward.

—Sage

Behind the Scenes: Lifelong Yoga Photo Shoot

We interrupt my regularly scheduled posts on breath to bring you behind the scenes at the photo shoot for our forthcoming book, Lifelong Yoga, to be published by North American Books in summer 2017.

Since the book targets people who are either new to yoga or figuring out how to make yoga a lifelong practice through their forties, fifties, sixties, and beyond, we wanted real-people models representing each of those decades, demonstrating real-world expressions of doable poses. Two of our models, Patricia and Victor, had previous commercial and runway modeling experience. The other, my husband, Wes, has been behind the camera many times snapping pictures to illustrate my writing, but never in front of it. Tammy Lamoureaux from L’Amour Foto and her able assistant, Brett, did a beautiful job keeping everyone natural and at ease, and Alexandra and I ran them through the poses. There were also snacks. Take a peek behind the scenes:

This is Patricia, a student at Carrboro Yoga. Unfortunately, our curls are obscuring most of her glorious cheekbones!
This is Patricia, a student at Carrboro Yoga. Unfortunately, our curls are obscuring most of her glorious cheekbones!
We shot in the Gold Circle Room at Carrboro Yoga, though you won't see it when you read the book, as we used a white background.
We shot in the Gold Circle Room at Carrboro Yoga, though you won’t see it when you read the book, as we used a white background.
Wes was a little sore after his modeling session! Modeling is very different from practicing—you hold poses longer and don't breathe naturally.
Wes was a little sore after his modeling session! Modeling is very different from practicing—you hold poses longer and don’t breathe naturally.
This is my standing view of one of the cover options.
This is my standing view of one of the cover options, shot with my iPhone.
And here's all the work happening behind the scenes to get the cover image!
And here’s all the work happening behind the scenes to get the cover image! Next book: yoga for photographers. Tammy spent hours on her knees on the floor with nary a complaint.

We can’t wait to put the finished product in your hands. We’re hard at work finishing the draft!

—Sage

Breath to Support Stillness in Your Yoga Practice: Balance and Twists

We’ve been looking at how your breath supports your movement in your workouts—see “The Right Breath for Now,” “Breath to Support Movement,” and “Breath to Support Movement in Your Yoga Practice.” While we aren’t always moving our bodies in yoga, we are always moving our breath. It’s in a constant flow. In this sense, all yoga classes are flow yoga classes—there is always movement of the breath, and therefore always movement in the body.

Don't hold a balance pose without breathing!
Don’t hold a balance pose without breathing!

Breath and Balance

When you’re holding a balance pose, it can be quite tempting to hold your breath. When you’re on the verge of finding balance, the breath can feel disruptive. But not breathing isn’t a long-term solution! When you’re in a balance pose:

  • Keep your breath flowing
  • Establish a steady rhythm of breath—counting out a rhythm, in-2-3-4, out-2-3-4 can help
  • Count your breaths, too: take 5 or more in a balance pose, and build this over time
  • Notice if you are tempted to hold your breath

Breath and Seated Twists

In twists, full inhalations will slide you marginally out of the pose, and exhalations will create space for you to deepen. When you’re in a seated twist:

  • Use inhalations to reestablish height up your spine
  • Use exhalations to twist deeper naturally—don’t force

Breath and Reclining Twists

Next time you’re neck deep in a pool or bathtub, notice how your full inhalations buoy you out of the water, while exhalations sink you deeper. The same experience applies when you’re on your back in a twist:

  • Feel the inhalations unwinding you slightly
  • Use the exhalations to settle even deeper to the floor

Next time, we’ll look at how the breath interacts with holding backbends and forward bends.

—Sage

Breath to Support Movement in Your Yoga Practice

IMG_1058We’ve been looking at how your breath supports your movement in your workouts—see “The Right Breath for Now” and “Breath to Support Movement.” You may be most familiar with watching your breath in your yoga practice, especially as many teachers cue your inhalations and exhalations. Here’s the thinking behind this cueing.

Prana

Generally, we use inhalations to help as we lift things. Consider the instructions, “Inhale, lift your arms,” “Inhale, grow tall,” “Inhale, rise up.”

Notice your next few breaths come in, and you’ll probably feel this lifting energy through your chest, and maybe in your belly. As your lungs inflate, your ribs expand outward and upward. Moving your arms up or lifting your torso up then naturally follows this rising energy—what we’d call prana.

Apana

Conversely, exhalations often help as we lower things: “Exhale, hands to your heart.” “Exhale, hinge at your hips.” “Exhale, lower to the mat.” On the other side of the breath, exhalations help you settle down and in. Watch your next few exhalations, and you’ll feel this movement through your chest and belly. It’s a release in your diaphragm that can be assisted by light contraction through your core muscles. This sensation of downward-moving energy is called apana.

On the Mat

Pay attention to the cues your teacher issues, and you’ll see this pattern at play. At home, experiment: try inhaling as you lift, and exhaling as you lower. Then try breaking the pattern and see how that feels. These aren’t hard-and-fast rules, and consciously testing them will help you stay present and engaged in the interplay between breath and body.

—Sage

Breath to Support Movement

In my last post, “The Right Breath for Now,” I posed a series of questions to help you observe how your breath coordinates with your movement, both during your workouts and in your yoga practice. This observation is a lifelong practice—once you get really curious about your breath, you need never be bored again! There’s always something interesting to watch, and the more you pay attention the more you’ll find fascinating subtleties in every breath.

This observation gives you baseline data about how your breath operates to support your activity. With this in hand, you’ve got a target to return toward when your breath gets out of rhythm. Keep watching!

Run2

Here are some ideas about how the breath can support you as you move in your workouts.

  • Use exhalations on exertion. Let your exhalations give you some extra oomph when you are pushing, lifting, or swinging. Exhalations help you engage through your core, especially your abdominal and pelvic floor muscles. These help support your spine and pelvis so you can better send power against the ground or the weight, or send power through the racquet or the club.
  • If you get a side stitch, reset your breathing pattern by varying which foot hits the ground or strokes down when you start inhalation and exhalation. That is, change from right to left, or left to right. This repositions your diaphragm on impact and can alleviate the stitch.
  • Use your breath to gauge exertion. At an easy warmup and cooldown effort, nasal breathing should be comfortable; at harder efforts, it may not.
  • Listen to your body—literally. If your breath is loud or wheezy, ease up. Look for a regular rhythm that helps you feel controlled and steady.

—Sage

The Right Breath for Now

Your yoga teacher talks a lot about the breath, because breath is, obviously, critical to your survival, and even defines your life. You may have found yourself practicing breath exercises in class—applying a ratio of inhalation to exhalation, for example, constricting your throat to create an ocean sound (ujjayi), or exhaling forcefully while pumping your abs like bellows (kapalabhati). Just like lifting weights are a means to an end, making your muscles strong so you can use them as you like, these exercises train you to strengthen and control your breath so that you can always find the right breath for now.

_DSC0168The beauty is that you probably already know what to do. These questions will help you discover the right breath—let them be a starting point to your self-study—and in my next posts I’ll add some suggestions.

In Your Workouts

  • When you walk, run, cycle, or swim, which foot hits the ground or pedals down, or which arm is raised, as you begin your inhalation?
  • Which is moving down as you begin your exhalation?
  • Are these the same?
  • How many steps or strokes are you taking on an inhalation?
  • How many on an exhalation?
  • When you lift weights or swing your racquet, stick, or club, are you inhaling or exhaling?
  • How forceful is this breath?
  • Are there times when you hold your breath?

In Your Yoga Practice

  • How does your breath move in the space of your body when you rest on your back?
  • On your belly?
  • How loud is your breath at rest?
  • How loud is your breath when you work—in standing poses, balance poses, or core exercises?
  • How long does your breath take to come in?
  • How long does your breath take to go out?
  • When you lift your arms, do you prefer to inhale or exhale?
  • What do you prefer when you lower?

There’s no need to change these yet—just notice.

Goldilocks and the Gauge

Sage-2015-4

Last week, while teaching a five-day intensive for teachers interested in working with athletes, I spent a lot of time talking about “the gauge.” How nice it would be, I said, if as teachers and coaches we could glance at a panel that would tell us how the students and athletes are doing. Are they redlining? Are they at a level of effort enough to induce positive change in the body? Are they snoozing?

Hitting the sweet spot—finding the middle that Goldilocks looked for: not too hard, not too soft, but just right—is best for growth. We see this in sports training and in asana practice. You have to have enough stress to encourage the body to adapt, but apply too much stress and the body will break down instead of building up. We want the porridge to be not too hot, not too cold, but just right.

Yet none of us have an externally readable gauge. Sure, you can measure your heart rate or power, and your teacher or coach can see the tells of over-efforting: a grimace, a gritted jaw. Ultimately, however, it’s up to you to choose the poses and workouts that will challenge you enough for change but not enough for corrosion or crisis.

Happily, age is an advantage. With a history of sports injuries or muddling through unproductive training cycles, you have the intuition to read the gauge from the inside. Your breath is your best tool—and that’s what I’ll discuss next time.

—Sage

Build Balance, Flexibility, and Strength While Donning Your Shoes

Do you want to include more yoga in your day, but feel pressed for time? Here’s a simple—but not easy—routine that will add some yoga-inspired moves to an act you perform daily: donning your shoes.

Side note: I wrote a piece about this routine for Runner’s World, “Warm Up While You Lace Up.” When the print copy of the magazine arrived, I proudly set it on the kitchen counter, open to my article. My teenage daughter walked by and scoffed, “What? There’s an article here about how to put on your shoes?!?!?”

“Look who wrote it,” I replied.

—Sage

Relief for Your Upper Back, Part 3

In  part 1 and part 2 of this series, we have looked at ways to stretch the chest and strengthen the upper back to avoid the hunch that can develop over time. But the chest and the thoracic spine aren’t the only areas affected by your slouching.

Problem

You’re prone to jut your chin forward when your upper back rounds, which shortens and tightens the back of your neck, while lengthening and tightening the front. Riding a bike, which means you need to look forward while your upper back rounds, will compound this problem.

Solution

Simple neck stretches can offer great relief. If you’ve got neck problems, talk to your health care provider before trying these, and keep comfortable throughout your movements.

In this video, I demonstrate some really easy neck and throat stretches you can do virtually anytime, anywhere (as long as you don’t mind getting some funny looks). Combine these with your chest stretches and upper back exercises, and you’ll be standing taller with more ease.

—Sage