Intentions, Goals, and Aging

Racing Wisely CoverIn my book Racing Wisely: A Practical and Philosophical Guide to Performing at Your Personal BestI suggest using both intentions and goals to plan your training and racing. While we’re all familiar with goals—running a certain time, lifting a certain weight, beating a certain opponent—intentions are more nebulous. In Racing Wisely, I define intention as the private, personal, often unmeasurable reason why you compete.

This sprang to mind when I read Gina Kolata’s New York Times piece on slowing down with age. The limitations of age force us to focus less on goals, or to adjust the goals based on age-grading charts like the one mentioned in the article, and more on intentions. We are less interested in training and competing for glory and more interested in the experience of being in our bodies as they move. This movement becomes less directed toward achieving a particular outcome and more toward the inner sensations and broader mental and physical benefits of exercise.

A similar pattern emerges among yoga practitioners. After several years of practicing, many of which may have focused on achieving increasingly sophisticated poses, we generally turn away from externally measurable achievements and toward the gentler expressions of poses, along with careful attention to the experience of being in a breathing body. Kolata’s article ends with her source’s suggestion of running watch-free. Can you bring the same approach to your mat? Can you emphasize intention over goals?

—Sage

Sweet and Safe Lower Back Stretches

In my last post, I wrote about the perils of rolling up from a forward fold position. Many of our students commented that they knew rolling up wasn’t particularly safe, but they loved how good it felt to stretch their lower back. There are more effective ways to find that same sensation. This week, I offer three easy ways to find a sweet (and safe!) low back stretch.

Problem

Rolling up to a standing position from a forward fold is not generally safe for the lower back, but for many people it feels good.

Solution

In this video, I offer several effective movements and poses that offer release for tight lower back muscles. These are safer than rolling up, although forward folds are still best avoided if you have bone density loss. Try exploring back stretching at a wall or in a doorway, try wiggling around in cat-cow on your mat, or sink back into a wide-knee version of child’s pose.

—Alexandra

The Art of Contentment

One of the restrictions of aging is a loss of flexibility and mobility. Not being able to move as much as we used to can lead to not moving much, which creates a negative spiral. One of the glories of aging is knowing that everything changes and developing a sense of acceptance. In yoga, we’d call that santosha, contentment. It’s the key to preventing avidya, wrong seeing, which you can read more about here.

This is a fine alternative to reverse table or reverse plank—like them, it stretches your chest while being sweeter on your wrists and shoulders.
This is a fine alternative to reverse table or reverse plank—like them, it stretches your chest while being sweeter on your wrists and shoulders.

To find contentment in your yoga asana practice, be clear on the purpose of each pose. When you understand why you’re doing something, it’s easier to find a substitute that will get the job done in ways that are appropriate for your body in this moment—not what you had in the last ten years, last year, last month, or even yesterday. Otherwise, you’re setting yourself up for struggle and “failure.”

Choose the path of right seeing by looking at what is happening right now.

—Sage

Your Guide to Standing Up

A common cue you may hear in a yoga class is to “roll up to standing” as you move from a forward-folded position back to standing. But for those of us with athletic builds or aging bodies, there are better and safer ways to return to a standing position.

A couple of weeks ago, I posted about osteoporosis and yoga, and we looked at the poses and movements you might want to avoid if you have low bone density. In particular, forward folds should be avoided by anyone with osteopenia or osteoporosis. But even if your bones are healthy and you practice forward folds, you should still avoid rolling up.

Rolling up to a standing position creates disc compression and stresses the back of the pelvis and sacrum. Rolling up also requires the lumbar spine (five vertebrae, located between the ribcage and the pelvis) to support the entire upper body for the duration of the roll up, with very little support from the relaxed abdominal muscles.

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Warren, 68, demos rolling up before we discussed the issues with this movement.

Rolling up probably won’t result in acute, instant injury, but over time it can cause disc problems and pain. When your instructor cues the class to “roll up,” here’s what you should do instead:

In your forward-folded position, bend your knees, and slide your hands onto your thighs. Lengthen your spine. Keeping your knees bent, begin to ascend to standing, leading with your chest.

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When you return to a standing position this way, your glutes to do the bulk of the work and your spine doesn’t bear all the weight of your upper body.

When I discussed this in a recent class, many of my students lamented the loss of rolling up because it feels like a pleasant way to stretch the muscles of the low back. There are safer and more effective ways to get that stretch. Look for future posts on that!

—Alexandra